Some not to miss events in Japan

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Obon: The festival of the dead

Obon (お盆): The festival of the dead takes place mid-August throughout Japan, although some regions celebrate it in July in connection with the lunar calendar.
Many Japanese people take days off to return to their hometown to pay tribute to their ancestors. Obon is the time during which we remember and we thank the ancestors for their sacrifices and takes place during the month of the ghosts, the only period when the dead can return to Earth.
The Obon festival lasts three days, but it may vary in different regions of Japan.
August 13 — Mukaebi or welcoming fire/bonfire in front of houses lights the way for returning spirits.
August 14-15 — Hoyo/Kuyo when families invite a Buddhist priest to their homes or visit a temple or shrine to perform a memorial service.
August 16 — Okuribi another bonfire or paper lantern to send the soul of the ancestors back to their world and also are organized bonodori dances performed for the deceased.
If you have the chance to be in Kyoto on August 16, the Obon matsuri is marked by Gozan no Okuribi, the feast of fire. For the occasion big fires are lit at the top of the five mountains of the ancient imperial city.

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Yokohama Triennale 2017

The Yokohama Triennial is Japan’s largest contemporary art event, held in Yokohama, the city’s Yokohama Museum of Art, the Red Brick Warehouse and surrounding neighborhoods.

Internationally known, it is this year the  sixth edition of the Yokohama Triennale will take place between August 04 and November  05 2017, with the theme “Islands, Constellations & Galapagos”.Art Bin performance

2017 also marks the 150th anniversary of Taisei Hokan or the restoration of the Emperor political authority and  the end of Japan’s isolationist policy, which led to Yokohama being the first port to open up to the west and International Art.

This year, a total of 40 artists from all over the world will exhibit, such as: Ai Weiwei, Joko Avianto, Aoyama Satoru,  Maurizio Cattelan, Alex Hartley…

Tickets for the event cost JPY1.500 in advance or 1.800 on the day, which also entitled you to ride the free shuttle bus between the venues.

More infos: Yokohama Triennale 2017

Heading to Fuji Rock Festival 2017

The Fuji Rock Festival, Japan’s biggest outdoor music festivals is held every year in the mountains of northern Japan at Naeba Ski Resort on the last weekend in July (July 28 – 30).
Every summer this gigantic musical event whose success never fails despite the emergence of many competing festivals in Japan attracts 150,000 people for three days and three nights.Fuji Rock Festival 2017
The festival, with an eclectic lineup attracts both young crowd and some in their forties and fifties. It was created by an event promoter, Masahiro Hidaka, inspired by the British festival Glastonbury.
Gorillaz, Alphex TwinLCD Soundsystem and Björk will headline the 2017 edition of Fuji Rock alongside more than 150 international and local artists performing over seven main stages, such as The xx, Death Grips, Father John Misty, Strugill Simpson, Bonobo…
Tickets are already on sale http://fujirock-eng.com/ticket.html
There are plenty of ways to access the festival and get accommodation there, but we can help you to do so. Contact us.

Official Video

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Japan’s best Sakura spots

Want to enjoy spring the Japanese way? Join us between March and April — preferably with a packed picnic — for the great cherry-blossom party known as Hanami. Japan has thousands of Sakura spots, but these are some of the best compiled in a ma.

We have few availability left for this incredible season. Contact us ASAP

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The Bean-Throwing Festival: Setsubun

Setsubun (節分) is a unique festival in Japan occurring every year on February 3.
It literally means “seasonal division” and commemorates the beginning of spring or risshun (立春) in the traditional Japanese calendar, although it’s still pretty much winter for most of the country.
But it is best known as “the bean-throwing festival”, a day to remove the evil spirits and bad luck of the previous year and to allow good luck into the home for the next year, done with a custom called Mamemaki (豆撒き).
It involves throwing roasted soy beans out the front home door, at shrine or temple or at a demon-masked individual while shouting “Oni wa soto! Fuku wa uchi!” (鬼は外! 福は内!) or “Demons out, good fortune in!”.
If you are around that day, why not participating in Mamemaki.

Heading to Fuji Rock Festival 2016

The Fuji Rock Festival, Japan’s biggest outdoor music festivals is held every year in the mountains of northern Japan at Naeba Ski Resort on the last weekend in July (July 22 – 24).
Every summer this gigantic musical event whose success never fails despite the emergence of many competing festivals in Japan attracts 150,000 people for three days and three nights.
The festival, with an eclectic lineup attracts both young crowd and some in their forties and fifties. It was created by an event promoter, Masahiro Hidaka, inspired by the British festival Glastonbury.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers will headline the 20th-anniversary edition of Fuji Rock alongside more than 150 international and local artists performing over seven main stages, such as Beck, Sigur Ros, Courtney Barnett, Ben Harper… and DJs like Groove Patrol, Ken Ishii.
Tickets are already on sale http://fujirock-eng.com/ticket.html
There are plenty of ways to access the festival and get accommodation there, but we can help you to do so. Contact us.